• The Undocs on the Bus - Dallas Morning News Editorial

    no papers no fear protest in phx

    Those without papers are often described as living in the shadows, a tired phrase that perhaps survives because it very neatly captures the predicament.

    If your life is defined in this manner, you can see the world but the world doesn’t see you, or at least doesn’t see you in all your dimensions.  A part of our labor market depends on this arrangement, whether we like it or not.

    Years ago, a story on one of these shadowy folk created quite a stir in journalistic circles because the subject was named and photographed in a Page One story, when that term meant more than it does today. But that’s not what made news. The furor erupted when  immigration authorities, using the information contained in the article, promptly arrested the subject of the profile and journalists and others angrily debated naming those “in the shadows.”


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  • The Metrics of Change

     

    Last week, the news broke that some really wonderful people at the National Immigrant Youth Alliance hadliterally infiltrated the Broward Transitional Center in Florida, what can only be described as a waiting-room-come-prison for immigrants.

    News trickled out that they were recording the stories of other people in the detention center, some who were in serious medical trouble, countless others who were being held for months, if not years, for having broken tail lights and an assortment of other ridiculous transgressions.  Ultimately, ICE wasn’t too pleased with what Viri and Marco were doing, so they kicked them out, but not before they inspired over 450 people to go on a hunger strike.  You can sign the petition for their release here.

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  • Austin: Fandango y nueva familia

     

    No Papers No Fear Ride for Justice had the opportunity to convivir with the Workers' Defense Project while in Austin.

    La jornada por la justicia sin papeles y sin miedo tenía la oportunidad convivir con el proyecto de defensa laboral en Austin.

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  • Travis County sheriff's immigration checks protested

    More than 50 people protested outside the Travis County sheriff's office on Friday, calling on Sheriff Greg Hamilton to stop participating in a program that detains and deports illegal immigrants.

    The protesters were aligned with a group of Austin-bound undocumented immigrants who are riding across parts of the nation in a bus to protest deportations.
     

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  • El "UndocuBus" hace parada en Texas

    Después de una semana en Phoenix, con actos de desobediencia civil, una marcha a las oficinas del Servicio de Inmigración y Aduanas (ICE), así como eventos artísticos y pláticas con la comunidad, los viajeros siguieron su camino, tras visitar Colorado y Nuevo México.

    "Hemos tenido una buena respuesta de la gente en los lugares a los que llegamos, y nuestro objetivo central en la convención es que el presidente (Barack) Obama asuma una postura acerca de la reforma migratoria antes de solicitar el voto de los hispanos", expresó vía telefónica Tania Unzueta, líder juvenil de los soñadores de Chicago.

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  • Photos: Visiting the Sheriff in Austin

     

     

     

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  • Tired of Living in the Shadows, Undocumented Immigrants Take to the Road

    Tired of Living in the Shadows, Undocumented Immigrants Take to the Road

    Tired of government inaction and what they call “political football” in immigration reform, a busload of undocumented immigrants are risking arrest and deportation to push for change.

    About 30 undocumented immigrants and their supporters boarded what they've dubbed the "Undocubus" Wednesday and rolled out of Phoenix, widely regarded as a battleground for immigrant rights. The Undocubus will pull into the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina in September.

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  • UndocuBus Comes to Austin: No Papers, No Fear – Ride for Justice

    “This summer, we are coming out of the shadows and getting on the bus. Our rights and our families are under attack and we’ve come too far to go back now.”

    On July 29, 2012, a special kind of bus tour across the American Southwest departed from Phoenix, Arizona. The passengers aren’t going to be relaxing in luxury resort spas or sightseeing majestic landmarks in the desert. There are no rock stars on board, at least, not in the way we’re used to thinking.

    The people riding on this bus have embarked on a precarious mission to show Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, along with the United States federal government, that they will no longer live in the shadows. They want to let them know that they are no longer afraid, and that they have begun organizing to take a public stand for the rights of undocumented people in the U.S.

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